A great deal of kids grow up playing as many sports as they can manage in a season, and while I gave many of them a try, I lastly accepted that athleticism was not my strong fit. I did, however, find that I had an eye for photography. I started taking blurred photos with the least expensive digital electronic camera I might get my young hands on till Santa shocked me with my first Nikon. As I taught myself how to use it through experimentation, my pals and family started to acknowledge my skill. Photography was a talent that I initially disliked having; it seemed “nerdy” to be taking pictures while all of my pals, my cousins and my brother were stud professional athletes. But, as my skills improved I began understanding that these “stud professional athletes” valued my image ideal images, and a great deal of other individuals did too.

Throughout high school, photography became a part of my identity. I could constantly be discovered on the sidelines of sporting events or school celebrations with my video camera. Players would text me an hour after games asking how quickly they would be able to see their action shots from the night. I even got some paid jobs for senior pictures and household portraits. Unpopular or not, individuals valued my skill.

Perhaps as a professional photographer I’m prejudiced, but I believe that in today’s world of social media, people value pictures now more than ever in the past. Pictures still serve their function of “recording a minute” but they’re no longer limited to Sports Illustrated covers or filling the household picture album. With innovation like portrait mode on iPhones and social networks apps like Instagram and VSCO, it’s simple to quickly share an aesthetically pleasing picture of exactly what you consumed for dinner on #FoodFriday.

While photos are a fun feature on the majority of social networks networks, they have actually also end up being a crucial part of visual communication in marketing strategies. If you do not believe me, have a look at these statistics featured in this chart,

  • In All About Images: Articles with pertinent images average 94% more total views than short articles without images.
  • A press release with pictures gets nearly 15% more online views than a text-only news release.
  • 60% of consumers who use online search state they choose to contact an organisation whose listing includes an image.
  • Almost 70% of e-commerce shoppers state the product image is crucial when making their purchase choice.
  1. Get Attention

A collection of pictures may be exactly what brings in an audience and keeps it scrolling down a website or media channel.

  1. Delivers a message with no words

Unlike words, pictures are fast in the sense that they require little to no effort to understand. A great picture needs to inform a story with little to no words. Given that visual information can be processed much faster, the individual on the other end will get your message whether they make the effort to comprehend it or not. With that being stated, it is necessary that your images are communicating the right message.

  1. Develops a non-verbal connection

If an audience associates your brand with an image, they will make that connection every time they see an image of similar kind.

  1. Viral possible

If a photo is eye catching, it is possible that the audience will share it with their audience, becoming a cycle. Image sharing features on social networks make it easy to instantly publish an image at the click of one button.

  1. Develops brand name trustworthiness

Marketing with regularly good images shows that your brand name worths detail and will do the exact same with work for clients.

  1. Use feelings

Feelings play a significant function in a consumers buying decision, so it is necessary to comprehend the consumers soft area and deliver a picture that hits them right there.

  1. Inspire action

Isn’t that exactly what an online marketer wants? Photo-oriented advertisements are more likely to stimulate action from a user than a plain call to action printed message.

When I was a kid learning ways to read, I constantly liked the books with more photos than words, and it ends up I’m not the only one. Believe it or not, many audiences will be more engaged with a piece that has actually photos built into it than one that does not.

  1. Build Trust

If someone likes what they see, they are most likely to keep looking. One great picture could lead your client to their next purchase of your product.

If pictures can capture and preserve the attention of your audience, your product sales will likely lead to more sales.

Tara Byrne signed up with the Proforma team as a Public Relations Intern in May of 2018. She is currently a student at John Carroll University studying Integrated Marketing Communication. In addition to her research studies, Tara functions as the general public Relations Vice President for her sorority, Gamma Phi Beta, and works for the Blue Streaks Sports Information Department. When she’s not studying or working, she delights in photography and costs time with her household and pals.